Number of COVID-19 Total Cases in Canada on April 10th, 2020

Global
On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) assessed COVID-19 as a pandemic.

This assessment by the WHO is not unexpected. Describing the situation as a pandemic does not change the WHO’s assessment of the threat posed by COVID-19 and it does not change what the WHO is doing. It also does not change what countries around the world should do. For that reason, it does not change the approach we are taking in Canada.

Canada’s public health system is prepared. Since the outset, the Public Health Agency of Canada (along with public health authorities at all levels of government across the country) have been working together to ensure that our preparedness and response measures are appropriate and adaptable, based on the latest science and the evolving situation.

Aside from Canada, other countries and regions are reporting cases (listed below). An official global travel advisory is in effect: avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice.

Risk to Canadians
COVID-19 is a serious health threat, and the situation is evolving daily. The risk will vary between and within communities, but given the increasing number of cases in Canada, the risk to Canadians is considered high.

This does not mean that all Canadians will get the disease. It means that there is already a significant impact on our health care system. If we do not flatten the epidemic curve now, the increase of COVID-19 cases could impact health care resources available to Canadians.

Check if you have been exposed
Have you been on a recent flight, cruise, train, or at a public gathering? Check the listed exposure locations to see if you may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Vulnerable populations
There is an increased risk of more severe outcomes for Canadians:

aged 65 and over
with compromised immune systems
with underlying medical conditions
Travellers
There are also increased health risks for Canadian travellers abroad. Because of these risks, the Government of Canada advises you to avoid all non-essential travel outside of Canada until further notice. This includes cruise ships.

For Canadians who have recently travelled, the Government of Canada has put in place an Emergency Order under the Quarantine Act that applies to all travellers arriving in Canada. This is to slow the introduction and spread of COVID-19 in Canada.

If you have recently returned to Canada and you have symptoms, you must ISOLATE. This is mandatory. If required, immediate medical attention will be provided upon arrival in Canada.

If you have recently returned to Canada and you have no symptoms, you must QUARANTINE (self-isolate) yourself. This is mandatory. You are at risk of developing symptoms and infecting others.

If you develop symptoms within 14 days:

isolate yourself from others
immediately call a health care professional or public health authority and:
describe your symptoms and travel history
follow their instructions carefully
We continue to reassess the public health risk, based on the best available evidence as the situation evolves.

Think you might have COVID-19?

Reference : canada.ca

US becomes first country to record over 2,000 coronavirus deaths in last 24 hours: Report

  • US has now recorded 18,586 deaths
  • Trump on Friday said he will make an announcement next week on US funding to the World Health Organizatio

The United States on Friday become the first country to record more than 2,000 coronavirus deaths in one day, with 2,108 fatalities in the past 24 hours, according to the Johns Hopkins University tally.

The US has now recorded 18,586 deaths and is closing in on the toll of 18,849 dead in Italy, which has seen the most fatalities so far in the global pandemic.

America is also approaching half a million confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 496,535 as of 8:30 pm (0030 GMT Saturday), an increase of 35,098 in the past 24 hours.

President Donald Trump on Friday said that his decision on when to reopen the US economy, shuttered due to the coronavirus pandemic, will be the toughest he has ever taken.

“I’m going to have to make a decision and I only hope to God that it’s the right decision. But I would say without question, it’s the biggest decision I’ve ever had to make,” Trump told a press conference.

Trump, who faces a tight reelection in November, is keen to get the US economy back open after weeks of tough measures that shut down businesses and transport across the country to slow down the virus’ spread.

However, he also faces warnings that a premature opening would put lives at risk.

“I have to make the biggest decision of my life,” he said.

Trump on Friday said he will make an announcement next week on US funding to the World Health Organization, which he has recently threatened to cut.

“As you know, we have given them approximately $500 million a year, and we are going to be talking about that subject next week. We’ll have a lot to say about it,” Trump told a news conference at the White House.

He said he would make the announcement “sometime next week.”

Trump has gone on an offensive against the WHO, where Washington is the principal funder, accusing it of pro-China bias during the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic, which began in Wuhan, China, last year.

The US State Department has homed in on what it says was the world health body’s failure to pursue an early lead on coronavirus out of Taiwan.

Taiwan, which has succeeded in limiting the virus to just five deaths despite the island’s proximity and ties with China, warned the WHO on December 31 of human-to-human transmission, Vice President Chen Chien-Jen has said.

China claims sovereignty over Taiwan, which rules itself, and has pressured international organizations like WHO around the world not to allow the island membership.

On Friday, China’s foreign ministry said the US comments were “fact-distorting” and politically motivated to shift blame for the pandemic, according to state-run news agency Xinhua.

WHO denies that it ever got an early warning from Taiwan about human-to-human transmission of the COVID-19 virus.

Reference : livemint.com

Coronavirus in the UK: Latest COVID-19 news and case counts

The country has reported 60,733 cases and health boards have recorded 7,097 deaths.

In the United Kingdom the number of confirmed Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases has reached 60,733 since the virus was first detected in the country in Feb. 2020. According to data from geographic information system ArcGIS, there have been 7,097 reported deaths with the virus (April 8) — the main symptoms of which are a fever, tiredness and persistent dry cough. This figure includes deaths in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

A majority of confirmed cases and related deaths are located in England. Each day across the UK there are 5,491 new cases and 938 deaths (April 8).

[Live Science is tracking case counts and relevant news from each region of the U.K. Find your region in the list below]

– Prime Minister Boris Johnson was admitted to St. Thomas’, a National Health Service hospital, after persistent symptoms of COVID-19. On Thursday (April 9), the BBC reported that the prime minister is conscious and in a “stable condition”, but still in an intensive care unit. Johnson tested positive with COVID-19 on March 27 after experiencing mild symptoms.

– In a daily briefing on April 2, health secretary Matt Hancock announced the government’s goal to raise testing for COVID-19 across the country to 100,000 per day by the end of April. This goal will include an increase in swab testing for critical workers and seriously ill patients to 25,000 a day in England by mid to late April, with aligned testing strategies planned across other devolved health authorities.

– On March 23, the UK government announced tighter restrictions on the population’s movement, with only essential travel and one piece of exercise per day permitted. This was in addition to restrictions on businesses, with restaurants, pubs and cafes ordered to close. The stay-at-home order remains in place, and according to the government it is under constant review.

– On Sunday (April 5) Queen Elizabeth gave a rare address to the nation, in which she thanked the efforts of everyone “on the NHS frontline”, as well as care workers and other essential roles. This is only the fourth time in her 68-year reign that she has made a special address, and it was watched by over 24 million people, according to the BBC.

On March 23, the entire nation was placed into stay-at-home lockdown after a public address from Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has since written a letter to every household in the UK. “In just a few short weeks, everyday life in this country has changed dramatically,” Johnson wrote. “If too many people become seriously unwell at one time, the NHS will be unable to cope. This will cost lives.”

The restrictions in place in the UK allow for citizens to leave their homes in only certain circumstances:

– Shopping for basic necessities, as infrequently as possible

– One form of exercise a day – for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household;

– Any medical need, to provide care or to help a vulnerable person; and

– Travelling to and from work, but only where this is absolutely necessary and cannot be done from home.

Though these measures from the Westminster government affect all countries within the United Kingdom, devolved governments in Wales and Scotland and the Northern Ireland Executive also maintain a level of control over specific countermeasures and advice given to the public and businesses.

Reference : livescience.com

Youngest COVID-19 death so far in Canada is Alberta woman in her 20s

Alberta Health confirmed that the youngest victim of the COVID-19 pandemic was a woman in her 20s from the Edmonton zone.

Alberta Health could not provide her exact age.

According to data from the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Alberta woman in her 20s is the youngest death of COVID-19 in the country at this point in the crisis.

As of Sunday morning, three people between the ages of 20 and 39 had died.

In addition to the woman, a 34-year-old Alberta man died of the virus, as had a person in Quebec between the ages of 30 and 39, according to PHAC data, making them the youngest victims of COVID-19.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the province’s chief medical officer of health, confirmed the young woman’s death on Friday, adding it is “not clear at this time if she had any underlying health conditions.”

Hinshaw said she has heard some people in Alberta suggest that young people do not have to be as concerned about the novel coronavirus as much as others, but said young people are also getting sick. Everyone needs to take the health crisis seriously as the pandemic still has so many unknowns to it, she said.

“Some people who are young and healthy will go on to have severe disease and even die, so until we have more information about who may be at greatest risk and more evidence about treatments, the best way to prevent severe illness is for all of us to perform physical distancing, stay home when possible, to avoid non-essential activities,” she said.

As of Sunday, April 5, Alberta had 1,250 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 23 deaths, according to Alberta Health.
Reference: globalnews.ca

Get in touch with us!

Big or small, we’ve got a solution when you need it. Our advanced service and support tools provide step-by-step instructions without being put on hold or waiting in line.

SiteLock